blackgirlgenius (olamina) wrote,
blackgirlgenius
olamina

certain people i know





I got my hearty laugh! Last night as I waited for the bus, drunk on two strong margaritas and good times after Girls Night in the backyard at my crib, the funniest thing rolled by: an ice cream truck cruising slowly up the avenue with a shredded up back tire, ice cream man slung out the side blasting Rich Boy's track Throw Some D's! Me and the other girl waiting for the bus busted up laughing. I doubled over and she laughe and yelled out "That was awesome!".

You can hear the remix(featuring Andre 3000 rapping again!) here please clench your teeth and try to get by Jim Jones' bullshit verse, the rest (Murphy Lee, Lil Flip, Rich Boy, The GAME) is worth it. One of my favorite songs at the moment.

Must set a new goal...what should the next goal be?



In other more important news, from Kaiser Family Foundation.......

New Study Finds That Food is the Top Product Seen Advertised by Children – Among All Children, Tweens See the Most Food Ads at More than 20 a Day
34% of All Food Ads Targeting Children or Teens are for Candy and Snacks Half of All Ads Shown During Children’s Shows are for Food

Washington, D.C. – As the fight against childhood obesity escalates, the issue of food advertising to children has come under increasing scrutiny. Policymakers in Congress, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), and agencies such as the Institute of Medicine (IOM) have called for changes in the advertising landscape, and U.S. food and media industries are developing their own voluntary initiatives related to advertising food to children. To help inform this debate, the Kaiser Family Foundation today released the largest study ever conducted of TV food advertising to children.

The study, Food for Thought: Television Food Advertising to Children in the United States, combines content analysis of TV ads with detailed data about children’s viewing habits, to provide an estimate of the number and type of TV ads seen by children of various ages. The study found that tweens ages 8-12 see the most food ads on TV, an average of 21 ads a day, or more than 7,600 a year. Teenagers see slightly fewer ads, at 17 a day, for a total of more than 6,000 a year. For a variety of reasons -- because they watch less TV overall, and more of their viewing is on networks that have limited or no advertising, such as PBS and Disney --children ages 2-7 see the least number of food ads, at 12 food ads a day, or 4,400 a year.

For each age group studied, food was the top product seen advertised. Thirty-two percent of all ads seen by 2-7 year olds were for food, while 25% of ads seen by 8-12 year olds and 22% of ads seen by 13-17 year olds were for food. Of all genres on TV, shows specifically designed for children under 12 have the highest proportion of food advertising (50% of all ad time).

“Children of all ages see thousands of food ads a year, but tweens see more than any other age group,” said Vicky Rideout, vice president and director of the Program for the Study of Entertainment Media and Health at the Kaiser Family Foundation. “Since tweens are at an age where they’re just becoming independent consumers, understanding what type of advertising they are exposed to is especially important.”

Types of Food Advertised.
Of all food ads in the study that target children or teens, 34% are for candy and snacks, 28% are for cereal, and 10% are for fast foods. Four percent are for dairy products and 1% for fruit juices. Of the 8,854 ads reviewed in the study, there were none for fruits or vegetables targeting children or teens.

Appeals Employed to Advertise Food.
One in five (20%) food ads targeting children or teens include a push to a website, and a similar proportion (19%) include the offer of a premium, such as a game or toy. About one in ten (11%) have a tie-in to a children’s TV or movie character.

Physical Activity Portrayed.
Fifteen percent of all food ads targeting children or teens include depictions of a physically active lifestyle, such as showing children skateboarding, snowboarding, or playing basketball.

Public Service Advertising.
The study also measured children’s exposure to public service messages on fitness or nutrition (whether donated or paid). Children 2-7 and 8-12 see an average of one such message every 2-3 days (164 a year for 2-7 year-olds and 158 a year for 8-12 year-olds). Teens 13-17 see just one such message per week, for an average of 47 per year.

“While public service ads on fitness and nutrition may well play an important role in helping to fight childhood obesity, we need to be realistic about our expectations, given how few such messages children see,” Rideout said.

The report was released today at a forum in Washington, D.C. that featured U.S. Senator Sam Brownback, food industry leaders, health officials, and consumer advocates.

Tags: children, diet, eating, goals, laughing, music, remix, rich boy
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  • much older

    Going through a stack of my old magazines, I came across this gem of a political cartoon from the October 1971 issue of Playboy.

  • transsexuals in iran documentary

    I just watched this incredibly heartbreaking documentary about transsexuality in Iran. It was even sadder than I expected it to be, but I feel…

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    Reckless was on TV again yesterday. The dance scene is incredible. Thank God someone put it on youtube.…